Middle School Art

MA1

MA1

My artwork represents two cattle cars with prisoners in the background. The first, focuses on a male prisoner in concentration camp clothing. The other shows paperclips in the shape of a fire to symbolize “death by fire” and the lives lost during the Holocaust.

MA2

MA2

My picture was made by using polyline, a tool in Google Draw, over an actual Holocaust picture to give it a more abstract look. The paper clips replaced the barbed wire to represent the six million paper clips and the number of Jews killed in the Holocaust.

MA3

MA3

My artwork is about an angel who died in a concentration camp. She’s praying, watching over her family who are still there. She’s holding a chai in her hand which means “life.” I want people who see my artwork to “never forget” what people went through and what they suffered.

MA4

MA4

My artwork shows Stars of David showering down representing Jews that traveled on cattle cars, to gas showers, and their death. The inscription on the grave means “Beloved.” The pipes lead through the horrible journey taken and lead to the words “Never Forget” because people should not forget this tragedy.

MA5

MA5

My artwork shows the concentration camp, Auschwitz, located in Poland. Arbeit Macht Frei means Work will set us free.

 


High School Art

HA1

HA1

The artwork that I created represents the physical and metaphorical imprisonment of the Jewish people. The German writing on the train means “German Train of the Reich.” I included this in my piece to show that it was the Germans which imprisoned the Jews and other minorities. It also adds and aspect of realism to my slightly modified version of the classic deportation trains.

 HA2

HA2

My piece shows the evil and horror that Auschwitz brought. This event terrorized so many people, not just the people of the Jewish community, but everyone around the world. It also shows how Hitler represented that evil. The words on my piece tell us that this horror can not be erased, but we need to remember it so it never happens again.

HA3

HA3

Based on the paper clip story, I created a sketch of the journey of the Holocaust victims (Jews, Gypsies, the disabled, political prisoners, and others deemed “undesirable” by the Nazis) from a boxcar to the gas “showers” to the furnaces to the only perceived freedom, offered by death and ash.

HA4 

 

HA4

My collage of a German boxcar depicts the struggle that many Jews went through during the Holocaust. The paper clips on only symbolize the Jews during the Holocaust, but they represent the chains and barriers that prevented them from escaping the boxcars and eventually the concentration camps.

HA5

HA5

This piece represents the journey Jewish people took to concentration camps.  On the left side, the Jewish family is happy and free. On the right, the family is being separated and in the back people are working and being killed. This shows how much their life changed during the Holocaust.

HA6

HA6

I used a combination of graphite, charcoal, and marker. I drew my work in the perspective of a person standing inside a concentration camp boxcar. The hole inside the center of the boxcar represents the “other side,” or freedom, that can be seen but not entered.

HA7

HA7

My piece represents and idea of how we can stick together to overcome challenges. It does not matter who you are, your race, your religion, everyone can stand side by side and be a light to shine in the darkness. Together people can accomplish anything.

HA8

HA8

I call this piece “Lost Boy.” It portrays a picture of a young boy whose parents were separated from him and taken away during the Holocaust. I chose to use charcoal as my medium to represent the darkness and tragedy of this time. Who knows if he survived…

HA9

HA9

Clipped is inspired by a project in Whitwell, Tennessee which filled a Nazi boxcar with 11 million paperclips to represent the casualties of the Holocaust. The name Clipped is in memory of how many lives were clipped too soon. Barbed wire, made of stretched-out paper clips, traps the boxcar and the Star of David showing the trapped feeling of people affected by the Holocaust.

HA10

HA10

In the train, the girl to the left is putting up a paperclip to honor someone who passed in the Holocaust. The Jewish boy to the right is a boy who isn’t really there, he’s holding his hand on the wall, processing his feelings into the wall of paperclips.